Highlights with Heidi: Provo River Bridge

Heidi Stringham History, Research Leave a Comment

This record describes the Provo River Bridge, which was built in 1914 and dismantled in 1941 prior to the filling of the new Deer Creek Reservoir. Heidi discovered this file while searching in Series 920 for a patron. This series contains bridge structural condition files created by the Road Commission to track the condition of bridges on state roads, as well …

Utah History Day: History in Government Winners

Lauren Katz History, News and Events, Research Leave a Comment

Each year, over 7,000 Utah students, from grades 4-12, embark on a research project for Utah History Day, part of the larger National History Day contest. Students choose a historical topic related to the annual theme, and then conduct primary and secondary research in libraries, archives, and museums. The final projects are presented in one of five ways: an exhibit, documentary, performance, …

Utah’s Road to Statehood: The Obstacle of Polygamy

Maren Peterson Digital Archives, History, Research Leave a Comment

In the last post, we explored the political obstacles that prevented Utah from becoming a state until 1896. There was another large obstacle that made Congress wary of giving Utah statehood: polygamy. Polygamy started in April of 1841 when Joseph Smith married his first plural wife. By the time the Latter-Day Saints moved from Nauvoo, Illinois, to the Salt Lake …

Clues to the Polk Directories

Alan Barnett History, Research

Those who have used Polk City Directories in their research know how valuable they can be in tracking individuals, institutions, and businesses over time. But it’s hard to know exactly how the directories were assembled and why information is presented as it is. A receipt found among records from the Murray City School District sheds just a sliver of light on …

Utah’s Road to Statehood: Political Obstacles

Maren Peterson Digital Archives, History, Research

As we continue our series on Utah’s Road to Statehood, we will explore the obstacles that prevented Utah from becoming a state until 1896. In early Utah, religion and politics were so closely intertwined that Congress refused to entertain the idea of statehood until the 1890s. Council of Fifty When the Territory of Utah was created in 1850, President Millard …

Utah’s Road to Statehood—Latter-Day Saint Pioneers

Maren Peterson Digital Archives, History, Research

Welcome back to our series about Utah’s road to statehood. In this post we will explore some of the history of the Latter-day Saint pioneers who settled in the Salt Lake Valley in the later half of the nineteenth century. Immigration to Salt Lake Valley The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints was founded in 1830 in New York …

Remembering the Castle Gate Mining Disaster

Guest Author History, Research, Uncategorized

On March 8, 1924, explosions within a Castle Gate coal mine changed the lives of over one hundred families in Carbon County, UT. A headlamp ignited methane gas, which in turn incinerated airborne coal dust and caused an explosive chain reaction killing 172 men. There were no survivors. The disaster left 110 widows with 264 dependent children. The Red Cross …

Utah’s Road to Statehood: The Earliest Utah Settlers

Maren Peterson Digital Archives, History, Research

Indigenous Americans The earliest settlers in modern Utah were, of course, the Indigenous Americans. The Ancestral Puebloans lived in the vicinity of Utah from 500-1300 AD. They were commonly known as ‘Anasazi,’ an exonym coined by the Navajos, and not preferred by the Puebloans, which means ancient enemies. The Puebloans occupied the southeastern portion of Utah, as well as portions …

A Glimpse into Ogden’s Black Community

Alan Barnett History, Research

Among records recently transferred to the Utah State Archives from the Ogden School District were two seemingly unremarkable 1960s-era photo albums from Pingree Elementary School. Despite the plain covers, the photos in the album revealed that Pingree Elementary was not just another school. The photographs provide a striking and human window into one of the important Black communities in Utah …

White Swan High Patent Flour sack

Kaysville-Layton Milling Company: a Trademark Story

Gina Strack History

Many small towns settled in the nineteenth century in Utah had their own flour mills. Kaysville, Utah was no exception, with its first mill built in 1866, about fifteen years after the first families started building a city center that largely still exists today. Kaysville is located in Davis County, about 16 miles north of Salt Lake City.  Early families …