“More Than His Share of Genius and Skill”: The Maps of Anton Nielsen

Alan Barnett Digital Archives, History, Research 2 Comments

The traditional function of a map is to convey information about geography in a two-dimensional way and on a scale that is comprehensible to the user. Maps document relationships of places and geographical features to one another and allow for calculation of distances. They can show lakes, roads, rivers, towns, and even invisible jurisdictional boundaries. But the richest maps are …

Butch Cassidy and the Wild Bunch

“All Were Rattled”: Butch Cassidy, The Castle Gate Robbery, and the Wild West

Lauren Katz Digital Archives, Research

This blog post was written by Emily Stoll, a summer 2021 Intern at the Utah State Archives and Records Service. She is a senior at Weber State University and working on her public history degree. On April 21st, 1897, the Pleasant Valley Coal Company located in Castle Gate, Utah, was robbed in broad daylight. Considered to be one of the …

Utah’s Road to Statehood: Seven Bids for Statehood

Maren Peterson Digital Archives, History, Research

The Latter-day Saints settled the Salt Lake Valley in 1847, and for the next fifty years they and following settlers fought for statehood. It took seven attempts to finally realize that goal. 1849 The Latter-day Saints settled the Salt Lake Valley in 1847. Part of the appeal of the land was that it belonged to Mexico. They felt they had …

Utah’s Road to Statehood: The Obstacle of Polygamy

Maren Peterson Digital Archives, History, Research

In the last post, we explored the political obstacles that prevented Utah from becoming a state until 1896. There was another large obstacle that made Congress wary of giving Utah statehood: polygamy. Polygamy started in April of 1841 when Joseph Smith married his first plural wife. By the time the Latter-Day Saints moved from Nauvoo, Illinois, to the Salt Lake …

Where Do I Catch the Train to Las Vegas?

Guest Author Digital Archives, News and Events, Research

Written by Tony Castro, Reference Archivist at the Utah State Archives and Records Service Research Center. These days, historic railroad stations across the country seem to be for everything except purchasing tickets and boarding trains. What’s more popular these days are a variety of services such as chambers of commerce, history museums, and antique shops. In some cases, the stations …

Utah’s Road to Statehood: Political Obstacles

Maren Peterson Digital Archives, History, Research

As we continue our series on Utah’s Road to Statehood, we will explore the obstacles that prevented Utah from becoming a state until 1896. In early Utah, religion and politics were so closely intertwined that Congress refused to entertain the idea of statehood until the 1890s. Council of Fifty When the Territory of Utah was created in 1850, President Millard …

1911 Birth Certificates Indexed Online

Gina Strack Digital Archives, News and Events

Birth certificates issued by the Utah Office of Vital Records and Statistics in 1911 are now indexed online! Access the Utah Birth Certificate Index to search names and view digital images for free. All birth certificates at least 100 years old are public, even if not online or indexed yet. In addition to identity and proof of citizenship, the registration …

Utah’s Road to Statehood—Latter-Day Saint Pioneers

Maren Peterson Digital Archives, History, Research

Welcome back to our series about Utah’s road to statehood. In this post we will explore some of the history of the Latter-day Saint pioneers who settled in the Salt Lake Valley in the later half of the nineteenth century. Immigration to Salt Lake Valley The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints was founded in 1830 in New York …

Utah’s Road to Statehood: The Earliest Utah Settlers

Maren Peterson Digital Archives, History, Research

Indigenous Americans The earliest settlers in modern Utah were, of course, the Indigenous Americans. The Ancestral Puebloans lived in the vicinity of Utah from 500-1300 AD. They were commonly known as ‘Anasazi,’ an exonym coined by the Navajos, and not preferred by the Puebloans, which means ancient enemies. The Puebloans occupied the southeastern portion of Utah, as well as portions …